31.3.12

Fenway Park, Boston

On our last day in Boston we toured the oldest field in major league baseball, Fenway Park. Now, I am not a huge baseball fan, and certainly not a Red Socks fan, but this tour was amazing. If you go to Boston, it's a must see attraction. I'll try to recall the historical high-points for you to read as you look through the pictures. 

Built in 1912, this field still looks basically the same as the day it opened. 

From the outside it looks tiny. Right in the middle of the city, it's very unassuming. 




The area surrounding the ball park is great. Nightlife, souvenirs, etc.


In the window of a radio station housed inside the park. 

Doing renovations in the offseason.





The first place the tour takes you is to the Green Monster seats. 
View from the Green Monster seats.  

The Green Monster is a popular nickname for the thirty-seven foot, two-inch high left field wall. Seats were added later on top of it, though they aren't the safest seats. Right-handed hitters hit directly at these seats quite often.

This was our tour guide, Louie. Thick Boston accent and knew everything there is to know about the "pahk" and the Red Socks. 
You should ask for him if you go. There was a young guy leading the tour that came in after us and there is no way it could have been as good. 



On our way to the Press Box.

From the Press Box. Great view of the Green Monster in left field. 

The oldest seats in baseball. These are the original wooden seats that were in the park the day it opened. They are hard, very close to each other, and mostly uncomfortable, but you feel like you're apart of history while sitting in them.


27.3.12

Marthas Vineyard: Offseason

After we visited Plymouth, we headed further south to Marthas Vineyard. We were there during it's offseason so much of the island was dead. During the offseason there are only about 15,000 people on the island, but when summer rolls around that number can increase to 100,000. It was fascinating to see. This is where the rich come to vacation and most of the island remains period appropriate. The homes and shops are beautiful, but without the modern stylings and technology. A vacation on Marthas Vineyard would truly be a time to get away.
Martha's Vineyard is an island located south of Cape Cod in Massachusetts, known for being an affluent summer colony. Often called just "The Vineyard," the island has a land area of 87.48 square miles and is the 58th largest island in the United States, and the third largest on the East Coast of the United States. It is also the largest island not connected to mainland by a bridge or tunnel on the East Coast of the United States.


On the ferry.
The fog clears.


Vineyard Haven or Tisbury

The most beautiful girl on the island.

Great bookstore in Tisbury
Edgartown










Edgartown

Loved this woodwork.


Back on the mainland.



"Plymouth Rock" and America's Hometown

For the second day of our Boston trip, we got out of the city and went to Plymouth and Martha's Vineyard. Plymouth is a cool little city. There are lots of neat shops and restaurants to compliment it's rich and factually creative history.
It's known as "America's Hometown." Plymouth was the site of the colony founded in 1620 by the Pilgrims, passengers of the famous ship the Mayflower. Plymouth is where New England was first established. It is the oldest municipality in New England and one of the oldest in the United States. The town has served as the location of several prominent events, the most notable being the First Thanksgiving feast.
The rock that someone arbitrarily chose to be "Plymouth Rock" at the place where the Pilgrims may have landed. 
They broke it in half while taking it to the city center in the 60's. You can see the crack that they filled with concrete. There is no historical evidence to prove its authenticity, still cool though.
Mayflower replica, the Mayflower II in Plymouth Harbor.


Thought this was interesting.




Antique shop.


25.3.12

Ken's Free Book Exchange: Cambridge, Mass.

Ken's Free Book Exchange | Cambridge, Mass. | Across from Harvard University

Sign reads, " 5 free books, per person, per day. Donations are not necessary although I will only do this as long as my wife, dog, and cat are safe, warm, and fed. Check Ken O'Brian on facebook I'll post by 8:30 am if I'll be open that day. I am across the sidewalk with a sign asking for change. Please give donations there. Thank You, Ken O'Brian

23.3.12

Boston Trip: Day One

We started our first day at a park that overlooks most of downtown.
The "Freedom Trail". We followed this line of bricks for 2.5 miles throughout the city to see all of the city's landmarks that played a role in our freedom from the British.

Love that line, "May the youth of today when they visit this old house be inspired with the patriotism of Paul Revere".

Cemetery in the middle of downtown. 

John Hancock's grave

Paul Revere's grave.

The pennies placed on his grave are thought to bring wealth to those who place them. Paul Revere was a silversmith, when he was not taking midnight rides, and also made pennies. 

Mother Goose's grave.

We were in Boston over St. Patrick's Day. Boston has one of the largest St. Patrick's Day celebrations in the world. 

Old City Hall


Statue of Paul Revere, Old North Church in the background. 

Paul Revere

Looking towards Old North Church, the path which Paul Revere would have rode to warn that the British were coming. 

Old North Church. "One if by land, two if by sea..."


Faneuil Hall Market